Mitsuba 0.5.0

Open source and cross-platform physically based renderer
Mitsuba is a free, open source and extensible rendering framework written in portable C++. Mitsuba implements unbiased as well as biased techniques and contains heavy optimizations targeted towards current CPU architectures.

The Mitsuba renderer currently runs on Mac OS X, Linux, and Microsoft Windows and makes use of SSE2 optimizations on x86 and x86_64 platforms.

So far, Mitsuba's main use has been as a testbed for algorithm development in computer graphics, but there are many other interesting applications.

Further details on how to use the Mitsuba renderer on your Mac are available here.

Main features:

  • Spectral rendering, black body radiation and dispersion
  • Customizable image reconstruction filters
  • High dynamic-range input/output using the OpenEXR format
  • Deterministic Quasi-Monte Carlo sampling
  • Adaptive integration
  • Depth of field

last updated on:
June 22nd, 2014, 20:27 GMT
file size:
37.9 MB
price:
FREE!
developed by:
Wenzel Jakob
license type:
GPL 
operating system(s):
Mac OS X 10.5 or later
binary format:
Intel only
category:
Home \ Graphics

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What's New in This Release:
  • Multichannel renderings:
  • Mitsuba can now perform renderings of images with multiple channels—these can contain the result of traditional rendering algorithms or extracted information of visible surfaces (e.g. surface normals or depth). All computation happens in one pass, and the output is written to a dense or tiled multi-channel EXR file. This feature should be quite useful to computer vision researchers who often need synthetic ground truth data to test their algorithms. Refer to the multichannel plugin in the documentation for an example.
  • Python integration: Following in the footsteps of previous versions, this release contains many improvements to the Python language bindings. They are now suitable for building quite complex Python-based applications on top of Mitsuba, ranging from advanced scripted rendering workflows to full-blown visual material editors. The Python chapter of the documentation has been updated with many new recipes that show how to harness this functionality. The new features include
  • PyQt/PySide integration: It is now possible to fully control a rendering process and display partial results using an user interface written in Python. I’m really excited about this feature myself because it will free me from having to write project-specific user interfaces using C++ in the future. With the help of Python, it’s simple and fast to whip up custom GUIs to control certain aspects of a rendering (e.g. material parameters).
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